Stress a major obstacle to better health

by Jake
(USA)

According to the APA poll of over 2,000 adults conducted online by Harris Interactive in early March, fewer than one in five adults (16 percent) reported being very successful at making health-related improvements such as losing weight (20 percent), starting a regular exercise program (15 percent), eating a healthier diet (10 percent), and reducing stress (7 percent) so far this year, although about nine in 10 adults (88 percent) who resolved to make a health-related change say they have been at least somewhat successful at achieving it since January.

Despite these efforts, about three-quarters (78 percent) of those who made a health-related resolution say significant obstacles block them from making progress, such as willpower (33 percent), making changes alone (24 percent), and experiencing too much stress (20 percent).

"Lasting lifestyle and behavior changes don't happen overnight. Willpower is a learned skill, not an inherent trait. We all have the capacity to develop skills to make changes last," said Katherine C. Nordal, PhD, executive director for professional practice at APA. "It is important to break down seemingly unattainable goals into manageable portions."

Lynne Vaughan, chief innovation officer of YMCA of the USA - which is partnering with APA to provide families with resources for healthy living- agreed. "YMCAs work with individuals every day to support them in achieving their healthy living goals. We've found that those who set short-term goals along the way toward a longer term behavior change are more successful at maintaining those changes," she said.

Psychologists with APA report that, with the right support, individuals can learn how to make lasting lifestyle and behavior changes, regardless of the importance they place on willpower or the influence of stress. "Is it will or is it skill?" asks health psychologist and past president of APA's Division of Health Psychology Dr. Karina Davidson. "The reality is that, with the right guidance, people can build and strengthen the skills they need to make even the toughest lifestyle changes," she said.

APA recommends talking about lifestyle and behavior goals with friends, family, or a professional, such as a psychologist, who can help navigate feelings and gain skills to successfully change behavior. With help, individuals can develop willpower and stay on track with their health-centered goals.

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